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THE COOLEST MUSIC FESTIVAL IN SOUTH CAROLINA

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Historical Plantation Tours




Tour 1: On Monday, April 23, 2018 the Music Festival will host a tour of Keowee Plantation. Keowee was the home of John Ewing Colhoun (the original Scots/Irish spelling of the name Calhoun) and his wife Flouride Bonneau Colhoun. The plantation house (which burned in the 1800s) of the Greek Revival style was built about 1792. Today, well-preserved ruins, a family graveyard and possible slave graves may be viewed at the site, which is managed by Clemson University. Some walking involved. Wear good shoes and bring water and snacks as needed.





 











The tour will also visit the grave of Andrew Pickens at the Old Stone Church Cemetery. The tour will last approximately 2-hours.


Meet at the old Bingo parlor next to Ingles on Hwy 93 at 9:30 a.m.. The Bingo parlor is to the L of Ingles as you face the grocery store, at the far end of the parking lot next to Issaqueena Trail. Vehicles with high ground clearance are recommended. $10 per person tour fee. For more information email clemsonmusicfest@att.net


Tour 2: The Music Festival is proud to offer a tour of the historic Ashtabula and Woodburn Plantation homes in Pendleton on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 co-sponsored by the Pendleton Historic Foundation and Cat Bus. The homes have recently received updates of period furniture and decorations of the era.

The tour will begin promptly at 9:45 a.m. in Central in front of J.W. Martin Real Estate office on Main Street. Please see MAPS on this website Home Page for directions. There is free parking in the Main Street area for several hours, so don’t worry about a traffic ticket. We will travel via Cat Bus to Ashtabula for about a one-hour tour and then on to Woodburn. The tour will end about 12:00 noon. No provisions have been made for anyone to meet the tour in progress. You must enter the tour in Central. The cost is $10 per person benefiting the Music Festival and the Pendleton Historic Plantation. If you have questions call 864-650-0585 for more information.

Ashtabula is a 10-acre historic site featuring a home built in 1825, by Lewis Ladson Gibbes and his wife Maria Drayton Gibbes. There is also a detached brick building on site, circa 1790, that was one of earliest licensed taverns in the S.C. Upcountry. Woodburn is a 12-acre historic site what includes a four-story mansion, built as a summer residence by Charles Cotesworth Pinckney in 1830; the "Moorhead Cabin" circa 1810; a Victorian-style carriage house; and a replica 2-room slave cabin.
















Woodburn is a 12-acre historic site what includes a four-story mansion, built as a summer residence by Charles Cotesworth Pinckney in 1830; the "Moorhead Cabin" circa 1810; a Victorian-style carriage house; and a replica 2-room slave cabin.